Afghanistan: UNICEF Reinforces Support Following Flash Floods

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The Children’s Fund also provided immediate cash assistance through its rapid response mechanism to help people recover and meet their basic needs.

On Tuesday, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) supported its response to the flash floods that hit northern and western Afghanistan, killing at least a dozen children.

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More Than 300 Dead by Intense Floods in Afghanistan

In the aftermath, the Agency immediately trucked in clean water and distributed hygiene kits, while mobilising outreach workers to educate communities on hand washing and safe water storage.

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The Acting Minister of Interior for the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, Khalifa Sirajuddin Haqqani, and the Chief of Intelligence, Mawlawi Abdul Haq Wasiq visited UAE, says Zabihullah Mujahid the spokesman of the IEA. During… pic.twitter.com/B5HJlV6Rzr

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It also sent mobile health and nutrition teams to treat the injured and sick, and brought warm clothes, blankets, household items and cooking kits to families who lost their belongings.

The Children’s Fund also provided immediate cash assistance through its rapid response mechanism to help people recover and meet their basic needs.

According to reports from the ground, tens of thousands of children are still reportedly affected by the continuing flash floods, especially in Baghlan and Badakhshan and in the western province of Ghor.

The disaster left at least 350 people dead and damaged 7,800 houses while more than 5,000 families have been displaced.

According to experts, the recent extreme weather in Afghanistan has all the hallmarks of an intensifying climate crisis as some of the affected areas suffered drought last year.

According to the agency, extreme weather events in the Asian country are increasing in both frequency and intensity, resulting in loss of life and livelihoods and significant damage to infrastructure.

The nation ranks 15th out of 163 countries in Unicef’s 2021 Child Climate Risk Index, which means that children are particularly vulnerable to the climate crisis and its effects compared to other parts of the world.

More Than 300 Dead by Intense Floods in Afghanistan | News – teleSUR English – https://t.co/T1m9EoNNhA #GoogleAlerts

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